Home Travel Lindt's incredible new museum features the world's tallest free-standing chocolate fountain

Lindt's incredible new museum features the world's tallest free-standing chocolate fountain


This new museum is sure to hit the sweet spot with chocolate lovers.

Called Lindt Home of Chocolate, it is dedicated to the Swiss chocolate brand – and features the world’s tallest free-standing chocolate fountain.

It also boasts interactive exhibitions, the world’s largest Lindt shop and a chocolateria, where visitors can make their own sweet treats.

Inside the Lindt Home of Chocolate museum in Zurich, which features the world's biggest free-standing chocolate fountain. It is 30ft tall

Inside the Lindt Home of Chocolate museum in Zurich, which features the world’s biggest free-standing chocolate fountain. It is 30ft tall 

The fountain, in the building's atrium, was officially unveiled by Swiss tennis player Roger Federer, pictured left. It features 1,500kg of real chocolate flowing over a giant Lindor ball

The fountain, in the building’s atrium, was officially unveiled by Swiss tennis player Roger Federer, pictured left. It features 1,500kg of real chocolate flowing over a giant Lindor ball

Smashing guest: Tennis ace Roger Federer contemplates a giant Lindt chocolate

Smashing guest: Tennis ace Roger Federer contemplates a giant Lindt chocolate 

Lindt Home of Chocolate, which cost 100million Swiss francs (£84.5million) to build, opened earlier this week in Zurich, with the 30ft-high free-standing chocolate fountain officially unveiled by Swiss tennis player Roger Federer.

The fountain, described as the ‘only one of its kind’, features 1,500kg of real chocolate flowing over a giant Lindor ball.

Lindt says to make this possible, ‘pipes with a total length of 94 metres (308ft) were laid inside the chocolate fountain, which is exactly 9.3 metres (30.5ft) high’.

The building’s interactive exhibition covers 1,500 square metres (16,145 square feet). Here, according to Lindt, visitors can learn about ‘the cultivation of cocoa, the history of chocolate, Swiss chocolate pioneers and chocolate production’.

The museum, which cost 100million Swiss francs (£84.5million) to build, opened earlier this week

The museum, which cost 100million Swiss francs (£84.5million) to build, opened earlier this week

Inside the museum's Chocolateria, where visitors can make their own sweet treats as souvenirs or gifts

Inside the museum’s Chocolateria, where visitors can make their own sweet treats as souvenirs or gifts 

The museum houses the largest Lindt shop in the world, pictured, which measures in at 500 square metres

The museum houses the largest Lindt shop in the world, pictured, which measures in at 500 square metres

Lindt Home of Chocolate has the first-ever Lindt cafe in Switzerland, pictured. It is hoped the museum will attract 350,000 visitors each year from across the globe

Lindt Home of Chocolate has the first-ever Lindt cafe in Switzerland, pictured. It is hoped the museum will attract 350,000 visitors each year from across the globe

At the end of the exhibition, the ‘Chocolate Heaven’ tasting room awaits, where guests can indulge in ‘endless fine Lindt creations’.

In the Chocolateria, Lindt’s ‘master chocolatiers’ will be on hand to help visitors make chocolate souvenirs and gifts.

And not only does the museum house the largest Lindt shop in the world, measuring in at 500 square metres (5,381 square feet), it also has the first Lindt cafe in Switzerland.

In addition, the Lindt Home of Chocolate has a research facility, where ‘professionals can develop recipes on a small scale and simulate the optimisation of production sequences and process technologies – factors that are important to the chocolate industry overall’.

The building's interactive exhibition about chocolate and how it is made, pictured, covers 1,500 square metres

The building’s interactive exhibition about chocolate and how it is made, pictured, covers 1,500 square metres

The exhibition informs visitors about 'the cultivation of cocoa, the history of chocolate, Swiss chocolate pioneers and chocolate production'

The exhibition informs visitors about ‘the cultivation of cocoa, the history of chocolate, Swiss chocolate pioneers and chocolate production’

The museum building took just under three years to construct and, according to Lindt, has a 'distinctive design'. Pictured is part of the interactive exhibition

The museum building took just under three years to construct and, according to Lindt, has a ‘distinctive design’. Pictured is part of the interactive exhibition 

Another part of the exhibition. Ernst Tanner, president of the Lindt Chocolate Competence Foundation, said: 'The Lindt Home of Chocolate will play an important role in safeguarding Switzerland’s position as a chocolate country in the long-term'

Another part of the exhibition. Ernst Tanner, president of the Lindt Chocolate Competence Foundation, said: ‘The Lindt Home of Chocolate will play an important role in safeguarding Switzerland’s position as a chocolate country in the long-term’ 

The museum building took just under three years to construct and has a ‘distinctive design’ with curving staircases, suspended walkways and imposing skylights in the ceiling, which lend the building a particular elegance’.

It is hoped it will attract 350,000 visitors each year from across the globe.

Ernst Tanner, president of the Lindt Chocolate Competence Foundation, said: ‘The Lindt Home of Chocolate will play an important role in safeguarding Switzerland’s position as a chocolate country in the long-term, as well as contribute to the transfer of knowledge across the entire industry.’

Entry starts from 15 Swiss francs (£12) for adults and 10 Swiss francs (£8.50) for children aged eight and older.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office currently advises against all non-essential travel to Switzerland.

Entry to the Lindt Home of Chocolate starts from 15 Swiss francs (£12) for adults and 10 Swiss francs (£8.50) for children aged eight and older

Entry to the Lindt Home of Chocolate starts from 15 Swiss francs (£12) for adults and 10 Swiss francs (£8.50) for children aged eight and older

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